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Genlias

Ask Yvette: What happened to Genlias?

Between 1995 and 2012, many archives in the Netherlands published indexes of birth, marriage and death records on Genlias (www.genlias.nl). Genlias was taken offline in 2013 and replaced by WieWasWie. Genlias was the most popular genealogy site in the country, and many people used it for their research. Ancestry.com still links to Genlias, even though all the links are broken now. This is Continue reading →

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photo of a church

How to find your ancestors from Reusel-De Mierden

As I explained in a previous blog post, an error in genealogy software changed “Holland” to “Reusel-De Mierden, Noord-Brabant, Netherlands” in many trees. Still, many people, are convinced that their ancestors are really from Reusel-De Mierden. The only way to be sure is to go back to the sources. The municipality of Reusel-De Mierden Reusel-De Mierden is Continue reading →

Sleeping woman

My great-aunt Hendrickje Stoffels, partner of Rembrandt van Rijn

Earlier this week I had the pleasure of going to the Rijksmuseum to visit the Exhibition “Late Rembrandt,” featuring the works of the latter part of Rembrandt van Rijn‘s career. A long-term wish of mine came true: I stood eye-to-eye with paintings and portraits of Hendrickje Stoffels, my 11th great aunt. Hendrickje Stoffels, partner of Rembrandt Hendrickje Continue reading →

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young girls with their heads shaven walking in procession

Finding collaborators in World War II

With the 70th anniversary of our liberation coming up next week, I thought I would discuss one of the most important record groups for research into World War II. During World War II, several Dutch citizens collaborated with the German occupation: some joined the National Socialist Movement (NSB), others betrayed Jews or were romantically involved with German soldiers. After the War Continue reading →

book with crest and hanging seal

Ask Yvette – Do I have a family crest?

Several people have contacted me wanting to know if they have a family crest. Five things to know about crests Most people did not have family crests. Most people who used family crests, were well-to-do. Often they were nobles, rich merchants (patricians) or administrators. If your ancestor was a poor farmer, chances are that he did Continue reading →

Tip of the week

Hendrik Jan Kastein death announcement

Quick tip – Don’t count on obituaries for common people

In the Netherlands, there has never been a tradition for writing obituaries for common people. After a person died, richer families posted a an announcement in the newspaper, but that usually did not contain much biographical information either. For most people, there would not have been any announcement in the paper. Read more about finding Continue reading →

Term of the week

Man in uniform signing a document

Dutch term – Huwelijksbijlagen

The huwelijksbijlagen or huwelijkse bijlagen are the marriage supplements: the documents that a bride and groom had to submit to prove their identity and eligibility to get married. See the article Marriage supplements: gateway to more information about your ancestors for more information about these records and how to use them for your own research.