Featured article

Woman in an alley

7 Tips for Finding the Address of your Dutch Ancestors

Are you thinking about coming to the Netherlands to visit the bulb fields and visit the places where their ancestors lived? Depending on where your ancestors lived and how wealthy they were, it may not be easy to find out exactly where they lived. Here are some things you need to know when trying to find the Continue reading →

Featured article

Throwing trash in the trash can

Column: Receipt

The receipt of the Teeven deal had been preserved: we could reconstruct how much money had been paid; even fifteen years after the fact. The drama that followed demonstrated that archiving is more than just preserving things well; it is also a matter of being able to find information again.* In the Netherlands, the national government has Continue reading →

signatures

Two Tenancy Contracts from the 1700s

Most farmers in the Netherlands were tenants, not owners. This can make it hard to find out where they lived, since we can usually only find deeds for the owners, not the tenants. Since so many of us descend from tenant farmers, I thought I’d share two tenancy contracts with you that I found for my ancestors. Continue reading →

Featured article

Entrance of the National Archives

Organization of Archives in the Netherlands

To find records about your ancestors, it is useful to know how archives are organized; even if you’re looking for online records. Government archives The most important sources for genealogical research are kept in government archives. Churches were required to hand over their baptismal, marriage and burial registers when the civil registration was introduced (in Continue reading →

plat map

Dispatch from Deuel

In the nineteenth century, there were several Dutch language newspapers in North America. The Dutch were spread all over the Mid-West, looking for opportunities to buy good farm land at a cheap price. These newspapers formed an important link in those migration chains, where people shared news about their colonies and the people who lived Continue reading →

Tip of the week

man lying on his death bed

Quick tip – No Cause of Death in Death Records

Dutch death records do not list the cause of death. Usually, there won’t be any surviving records that allow you to find out how your ancestor died. Here are some things you can try to find the cause of death.

Term of the week

Dutch citizens climbing onto a British tank

Dutch term – Oorlog

The term oorlog means war. When Dutch people speak about “the war,” they usually refer to World War II. From 10 May 1940 until 5 May 1945, the Netherlands was occupied by Germany. Some parts of the country were liberated earlier, but it would take until 5 May 1945 for the Germans to surrender. That will Continue reading →