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Cemetery in Winterswijk

How I use DNA for my one-place-study

My father’s family is from a small village in the Netherlands called Winterswijk. All 2,000+ ancestors of his that I’ve been able to trace so far were from Winterswijk or the immediate surroundings. People first started living in that area in the early Middle Ages and I would not be surprised to find out that Continue reading →

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Genlias

Ask Yvette: What happened to Genlias?

Between 1995 and 2012, many archives in the Netherlands published indexes of birth, marriage and death records on Genlias (www.genlias.nl). Genlias was taken offline in 2013 and replaced by WieWasWie. Genlias was the most popular genealogy site in the country, and many people used it for their research. Ancestry.com still links to Genlias, even though all the links are broken now. This is Continue reading →

photo of a church

How to find your ancestors from Reusel-De Mierden

As I explained in a previous blog post, an error in genealogy software changed “Holland” to “Reusel-De Mierden, Noord-Brabant, Netherlands” in many trees. Still, many people, are convinced that their ancestors are really from Reusel-De Mierden. The only way to be sure is to go back to the sources. The municipality of Reusel-De Mierden Reusel-De Mierden is Continue reading →

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Sleeping woman

My great-aunt Hendrickje Stoffels, partner of Rembrandt van Rijn

Earlier this week I had the pleasure of going to the Rijksmuseum to visit the Exhibition “Late Rembrandt,” featuring the works of the latter part of Rembrandt van Rijn‘s career. A long-term wish of mine came true: I stood eye-to-eye with paintings and portraits of Hendrickje Stoffels, my 11th great aunt. Hendrickje Stoffels, partner of Rembrandt Hendrickje Continue reading →

young girls with their heads shaven walking in procession

Finding collaborators in World War II

With the 70th anniversary of our liberation coming up next week, I thought I would discuss one of the most important record groups for research into World War II. During World War II, several Dutch citizens collaborated with the German occupation: some joined the National Socialist Movement (NSB), others betrayed Jews or were romantically involved with German soldiers. After the War Continue reading →

Tip of the week

The neglected wife encourages her husband to sort himself out

Quick tip – Adultery may not have been the real ground for divorce

Until 1971, adultery was one of the few grounds that the law recognized to grant a divorce. Many people who found themselves incompatible lied about having an affair to be able to get a divorce. So if your ancestors were divorced and you find ‘overspel’ [adultery] listed as the ground in the divorce proceedings, it Continue reading →

Term of the week

Girls sitting around a table doing needlework

Dutch term – Voogd

A voogd is a guardian. Before 1811, guardians were usually appointed by the Weeskamer (orphan chamber). After 1811, they were appointed by the court. You can find guardianship appointments in the court records.