Quick tip – No Cause of Death in Death Records

Dutch death records do not normally list the cause of death. Only in unusual cases, for example if the person died at sea or was found dead outside somewhere, will a death record give you a clue about the cause of death. Usually, there won't be any surviving records that allow you to find out how your ancestor died. Here are some things you can … [Read more...]

Dutch term – Oorlog

The term oorlog means war. When Dutch people speak about "the war," they usually refer to World War II. From 10 May 1940 until 5 May 1945, the Netherlands was occupied by Germany. Some parts of the country were liberated earlier, but it would take until 5 May 1945 for the Germans to surrender. That will be 71 years ago this week. On May 4th, … [Read more...]

Column: Receipt

The receipt of the Teeven deal had been preserved: we could reconstruct how much money had been paid; even fifteen years after the fact. The drama that followed demonstrated that archiving is more than just preserving things well; it is also a matter of being able to find information again.* In the Netherlands, the national government has a … [Read more...]

Quick tip – More newspapers in Delpher

The newspaper website Delpher has had a major update. 79 new (old!) newspapers have been added, including: Algemeen Handelsblad 1875-1909 Apeldoornsche courant 1861-1924 Arnhemsche courant 1851-1950 Bredasche Courant 1914-1950 Curaçaosche Courant 1840-1881 Middelburgsche Courant 1801-1837 Nederlandsche Staatscourant … [Read more...]

Dutch term – Koning and Koningin

A koning is a king and a koningin is a queen. The Netherlands has been a monarchy since 1806, when Napoleon crowned his brother Lodewijk Napoleon as King of what was then called the Kingdom of Holland. In 1815, after the French had been defeated, King Willem I of the House of Orange was inaugurated as the first King of the Netherlands. The … [Read more...]

Two Tenancy Contracts from the 1700s

Most farmers in the Netherlands were tenants, not owners. This can make it hard to find out where they lived, since we can usually only find deeds for the owners, not the tenants. Since so many of us descend from tenant farmers, I thought I'd share two tenancy contracts with you that I found for my ancestors. It is rare to find such a contract, … [Read more...]

Quick tip – Don’t stop looking after they left

Don't stop looking for your family in a town just because they don't live there anymore. They may still own property there, have business partners there, or may be heirs of people who stayed behind. In notarial records, I often find references to children living abroad, for instance when one of their parents died and their estate needed to be … [Read more...]

Dutch term – Achternicht

An achternicht (literally: behind cousin) is a female relative. The term covers the English terms great-niece, first cousin once removed and second cousin. The male form is achterneef. … [Read more...]

Organization of Archives in the Netherlands

To find records about your ancestors, it is useful to know how archives are organized; even if you're looking for online records. Government archives The most important sources for genealogical research are kept in government archives. Churches were required to hand over their baptismal, marriage and burial registers when the civil registration … [Read more...]

Quick tip – Beware of same-named towns

If you are researching immigrants, beware that immigrants often named towns after their place of origin, so there might be two or more places by that name, perhaps thousands of kilometers apart. When a New Netherland records says "Haerlem," did they mean Harlem in current-day New York or Haarlem in the Netherlands? If your Michigan ancestor was … [Read more...]