Quick tip – Amsterdam maps

The Amsterdam City Archives published a wonderful collection of maps on their website. You can view the scans at high resolution and then select "Bekijk op de kaart" to see them projected on a modern map. By moving the transparency slider back and forth, you can easily compare the current and the old situation. Go to the maps collection of the … [Read more...]

Dutch term – Postbode

A postbode is a mail man. For large parts of the 1800s and 1900s, the government controlled the delivery of the mail and mail men were civil servants. You can find their personnel and pension records at the Nationaal Archief in The Hague. … [Read more...]

Differences between Genealogy in the Netherlands and the US

On Facebook, Linda Roos asked me about the differences between genealogy in the Netherlands and the United States. That topic warrants a longer reply than I gave her on Facebook, so here we go! 1: Quality of sources In the Netherlands, we have an abundance of high-quality sources. Since 1850, we have had the population register, recording who … [Read more...]

Quick tip – Who Else had that Rare Name?

As you probably know, Dutch children were usually named after family members. If one of your brick wall ancestors had an unusual name, or gave one of their children an unusual name, it might be worthwhile to look who else in the community shared that name. You can then investigate that person's family to see if your brick wall ancestors fits in … [Read more...]

Dutch term – Regest

A regest is an abstract of a record, usually of a medieval charter. Many archives provide regesten of their oldest records, which are often in Latin and in a handwriting that is hard to read to modern eyes. You can find regesten at the websites of archives, or in published oorkondenboeken (charter books). See the article about Oorkonde (charter) … [Read more...]

The Bosch’ Protocol Crowdsourcing Project

442 years of records, spanning the period of 1367 to 1809. One of the most complete series of court records anywhere in the country. More than half of them in Latin. The Bosch' Protocols, the voluntary court records of the jurisdiction of 's-Hertogenbosch in Brabant, are a treasure trove of information. It has wills. It has deeds. It has … [Read more...]

Quick tip – Don’t confuse the date of the record and the event

Births and deaths are created within several days of the event. The first date that you will find in the birth record or death record is the record date. Further down in the record, you will find the actual birth or death date, which could have been up to five days earlier. Indexes sometimes only have the record date, so make sure to always … [Read more...]

Yvette Hoitink, Certified Genealogist

I have just received news from the Board for Certification of Genealogists that my application for the Certified Genealogist® credential has been successful. In the Netherlands, genealogy standards are mostly unknown. The solution to most genealogical problems is to search until we find direct evidence, which we generally have in abundance. It … [Read more...]

Dutch term – Family Relationships

This diagram shows you the Dutch terms for the most common family relationships. In practice, we don't use the more distant relationships than achterneef/achternicht; we just call them "verre neef" or "verre nicht" [distant cousin]. … [Read more...]

Ask Yvette: Untangling two same-named women

My distant cousin, Fred Geurkink, asked me the following question [edited for brevity]: My grandma Gigi, (Marion Peterson), wrote down in her recollections about my great great grandma Grietje Koning. Said she was born on 30 Aug 1834, married my gg grandpa Jan Pieters Stelma on 23 Jun 1856, etc etc. On Ancestry, I received "hints" about said … [Read more...]