Quick tip: WieWasWie now available in English

WieWasWie logo

WieWasWie (WhoWasWho) is the most comprehensive genealogical database in the Netherlands. Archives in all the provinces participate in this website to publish indexes and sometimes even scans of their records. Up until now, WieWasWie was only available in Dutch but an English version is now available. >>Go to the English version of … [Read more...]

How Software Errors Corrupt Our Trees

Infographic

Infographic The article I wrote about major problems with new Dutch records on Ancestry.com sparked some great discussions both here and on several Facebook groups. People were especially appalled by the error that caused 'Burgerlijke Stand' (Civil Registration) to be included in the place name. But this isn't the biggest error caused by … [Read more...]

Major problems with new Dutch records on Ancestry.com

Windmill during a water surge

Through its partnership with Familysearch.org, Ancestry.com added millions of records from the Netherlands to their website this week. Just search the Card Catalog for databases with 'Netherlands' in the title. The new record sets include: Netherlands, Select Births and Baptisms, 1564-1910 (in Dutch) [6.2 million records] Netherlands, Select … [Read more...]

Quick tip: Dutch is not the language of Denmark

Map of northern Europe

If you're familiar with Dutch genealogy, today's tip will not come as a surprise: Dutch is the language and adjective of the Netherlands, not Denmark. But you would be surprised how many people end up on this site if they find out they have ancestors from Denmark! I must admit that the combination Dutch-Denmark sounds a lot more logical than … [Read more...]

Quick tip: US Dutch Reformed Church Records Online

Bloomingburg Dutch Reformed Church

Ancestry.com has just published a new record set: "U.S., Dutch Reformed Church Records from Selected States, 1660-1926". This record set was created by the Holland Society and currently contains records of Dutch Reformed churches in New York and New Jersey. Records from Dutch Reformed churches in other states will be added in the future. The … [Read more...]

Quick tip – test the new Brabant archives website

Front page of the new BHIC website

Christian van der Ven, archivist at the Brabant Historical Information Center, just commented on this week's column. He revealed that they are working on a new website, which is now available as a beta. The new website already contains more genealogical sources than the old, so it's well worth a test drive. Check the 'Mijn stamboom' [my family … [Read more...]

Column: for granted

Border crossing Enschede-Gronau

The other day, I was fortunate to discover that two resources that I needed for my research were put online. The Tilburg Regional Archives put up the population registers of Terheijden, a town where some of my maternal ancestors come from. Shortly afterwards, I noticed that the Gelderland Archives put the death duties files online, which allowed me … [Read more...]

Quick tip: resolutions for 2014

Firemen eating 'oliebollen'

Happy 2014 everybody! Here are some suggestions for resolutions for this year that will help you with your Dutch research. Come visit the Netherlands and see where your ancestors lived Learn Dutch and understand the records. The Dutch Terms section of this site has some basic terms to get you started. Learn to use Dutch websites … [Read more...]

Looking back on 2013

Who Do You Think You Are Live in 2013

The end of the year is fast approaching. And what a year it has been! One of my first highlights of the year was attending Who Do You Think You Are Live in London in February. I was able to stay with an American friend/cousin who was living in the UK at the time. I had not seen her in person since 1997 and was so happy to see her again and … [Read more...]

Quick tip: Beware that you don’t translate names

boy looking at paper of boy sitting next to him

Many genealogists who don't speak Dutch use Google Translate or Chrome to translate Dutch websites into English. But sometimes, these programs translate more than you want. A person named Van der Molen might become From the Mill or a Dhr. Timmerman becomes Mr. Carpenter. The same could happen with geographical names: a village called De Rijp … [Read more...]