Dutch term – Schrikkeljaar

A schrikkeljaar is a leap year. Before 1582, the entire region that is now the Netherlands used the Julian calendar, in which every fourth year is a leap year. Between 1582 and 1700, the different provinces switched to the Gregorian calendar, in which centurial years are not leap years except when they are divisible by 400. This corrected the … [Read more...]

Dutch term – Wintermaand

Wintermaand (literally: Winter month) is the old word for December. … [Read more...]

Dutch term – Slachtmaand

Slachtmaand literally means "slaughter month" and is the old word for November. … [Read more...]

Dutch term – Wijnmaand

Wijnmaand literally means "wine month" and is the old word for October. … [Read more...]

Quick tip: Mind the calendar!

When you encounter a date in original records that is between 1582 and 1701, it could be in either the Julian or the Gregorian calendar, depending on the province where the record was created. This means the date you find could be as much as twelve days "off." Read more about the introduction of the Gregorian calendar in the Netherlands and the … [Read more...]

Dutch term – Herfstmaand

Herfstmaand (literally: Autumn month) is the old word for September. … [Read more...]

Dutch term – Oogstmaand

Oogstmaand literally means "harvest month" and is the old word for August. … [Read more...]

Dutch term – Hooimaand

Hooimaand (literally: hay month) is the old word for July. … [Read more...]

Dutch term – Pinksteren

The word 'Pinksteren' is Dutch for Pentacost, a religious holiday. In the Netherlands is it celebrated on Pentacost Sunday and the following day. Pentacost Monday is an official holiday and most of the people in the country have the day off. Nowadays, many people take the opportunity to go to a music festival, go to the beach or attend some … [Read more...]

Dutch term – Zomermaand

Zomermaand literally means "Summer month" and is the old word for June. … [Read more...]