Dutch and New Netherland Records Online in February 2017

The following records from the Netherlands have become available online:

  • FamilySearch published a new collection, “Netherlands, Archival Indexes, Miscellaneous Records.” This collection contains indexes from Open Archives which publishes genealogical records that are made available as open data by the Dutch government. In many cases, the Open Archives website includes links to the images of the original records. This means these indexes are now available as record hints for people using FamilySearch to compile their family tree, or who use software that interfaces with FamilySearch such as RootsMagic.
  • Scans and descriptions of New Netherland records, from the period when the Dutch ruled what is now New York, have been published at the “Digital Collections” section of the website of the New York State Archives, where the descriptions can be searched. You can also go to the “Online Publications” section of the New Netherland Institute website, click on the record group you are interested in, and then click on the link to the manuscript images. 
  • Mark Rabideau made a range of public domain resources about Early Albany & Schenectady Histories, Mohawk and Hudson River Valleys, and New Netherland materials on his Many Roads blog.
  • Over 570,000 church records mentioning over 1.5 million people from West-Brabant were added to WieWasWie
  • The Venlo City Archives published the scans and indexes of the Civil Registration records of Venlo and surrounding towns (1792-1950).
records in the archives

Records in the archives. Credits: Rob Mieremet, collection Nationaal Archief (CC-BY-SA)

About Yvette Hoitink

Yvette Hoitink is a professional genealogist in the Netherlands. She has been doing genealogy for almost 25 years. Her expertise is helping people from across the world find their ancestors in the Netherlands. Read about Yvette's professional genealogy services.

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