About this website

Creating a website like this is a fun activity. There are so many options, so many choices. What do visitors want? What do I want? In this blog I will describe some of the things I encounter in developing and maintaining this website.

Quick tip – Check websites of local archives

When you're researching, don't limit your research to national or international websites like Open Archives or Ancestry. Also check the websites of local archives. Every municipality in the Netherlands has a contract with an archive to keep their records. This can either be an archive specific for that one municipality, or a regional archive that … [Read more...]

Dutch Genealogy News for December 2020

Here are new sources and projects that were announced last month. Sources The records of the Bishop of 's-Hertogenbosch between 1559 and 1650 have been digitized and are now available via the website of the Brabants Historisch Informatie Centrum. The records of  the bishop are in finding aid 2147, the old parish files are in finding aid 2074, … [Read more...]

Records that became public in 2021

Happy New Year everybody! Many records become public after 25, 50, 75, or 100 years. Here is an overview of some of the records that became public as of 1 January 2021. Exceptions may exist for records that involve people that could still be alive. Civil registration records: Birth records from 1920 Marriage records from 1945 Death … [Read more...]

Was Eleanor of Aquitaine my Ancestor? Generation 24 – Margaret of Flanders

This is the twenty-fifth post in a series about my possible line of descent from Eleanor of Aquitaine. In the first post, I explained how I discovered the possible line, and how I am going to verify it one generation at a time. In the last post, I proved that my twentieth great-grandfather Duke John II of Brabant was the son of Margaret of Flanders … [Read more...]

Quick tip – Check notaries in neighboring towns

If you are looking for notarial records, be sure to check in neighboring towns too. Unlike civil registrations or court records, there was no requirement to go to the notary in your own town. Sometimes, people lived in the countryside and the notary of a neighboring town was more convenient. Your ancestor could also appear in notarial records in … [Read more...]

Quick tip – “De” Names do not mean Huguenot

The prefix "de" in a name can be confusing. It means "the" in Dutch but can also mean "de" in French. People who have done Huguenot research often assume a "de"-name indicates a French or Huguenot origin. But when you're dealing with a Dutch family, think horses not zebras: your Dutch ancestor with a "de" name was probably Dutch. The most … [Read more...]

Quick tip – Who was the previous owner?

When you hit a brick wall and the ancestor whose parents you're looking for owned property, try and find out who owned the property previously. The previous owner may have been related, if the ancestor inherited the property, or may have created a sale or conveyance record that mentions your ancestor. For an example of how useful tracing the … [Read more...]

Dutch Genealogy News for November 2020

Here are new websites and sources that were announced last month. Sources The Historisch Centrum Overijssel has digitized several Overijssel notarial records 1836-1925. The scans are now available via the finding aid. The contemporary indexes ("repertoires") of the notarial records from The Hague (1843-1935) have been scanned and are … [Read more...]

Quick tip – Was there a prenuptial agreeement?

In some cases, couples made a prenuptial agreement when they married. Often, this was the case when at least one of the spouses had assets to protect, or when one of the spouses was richer than the other. The typical arrangement was that if one of them died without children, that person would receive a sum of money while the survivor kept the rest. … [Read more...]

Eight Dutch Naming Patterns to Watch Out For

Understanding how Dutch people named their children or themselves will help you solve your family mysteries. Here are eight Dutch naming patterns to watch out for. Naming children after grandparents Many Dutch children were named after their grandparents, often in a specific order: the first son after the paternal grandfather, second son … [Read more...]