About this website

Creating a website like this is a fun activity. There are so many options, so many choices. What do visitors want? What do I want? In this blog I will describe some of the things I encounter in developing and maintaining this website.

Dutch Genealogy Services – COVID-19 Measures

The Dutch government announced new measures to contain the spread of COVID-19 (corona virus). Large events are cancelled, people with a cold, cough, or fever are asked to quarantine themselves, and all people in the Netherlands are asked to work from home as much as possible. Dutch Genealogy Services will abide by these instructions. That means … [Read more...]

Ask Yvette – How to record transgender people?

In the Netherlands, it's legal for transgender persons change their gender and names on their birth records and in the population registration. You need to be at least sixteen years old and need a declaration by a gender specialist before you can go to the municipality to have your information changed, so it's not an easy process. In recent years, … [Read more...]

Quick tip – AncestryHour Interview with Yvette Hoitink

Yvette Hoitink was interviewed by Daniel Loftus for the first episode of "Meet who you tweet" at AncestryHour. Daniel is a young genealogist from Ireland and Ambassador for Youth for #AncestryHour, the weekly Twitter meetup for genealogists across the world. Go to the interview. … [Read more...]

Dutch Genealogy News for February 2020

Here is an overview of the new sources, projects, and news about archives that were announced last month. Online sources Over 24,000 more magazines and 5,000 books from 1940-1960 are now available via Delpher, after the Royal Library came to an agreement with representatives of copyright holders. Scans and indexes of population registers … [Read more...]

Quick tip – Why did they not marry in May?

If your ancestors were farm workers in the 1800s, and did not marry in May, check the birth date of their oldest child. Most work contracts ran from May to May. Farm workers who planned on getting married, often married in May so they could then move in together and maybe lease their own farm. When there was a baby on the way, it was … [Read more...]

Quick tip – Don’t Stop Looking When They’re Dead

Sometimes, relevant records are produced long after the person of interest is dead. Here are some examples: ¬†An estate may remain undivided during the surviving spouse's lifetime. The records of how the estate was divided and who the heirs were might be decades later. A record may have been copied at a later time, for example as part of … [Read more...]

24-hour Chat Marathon by Brabant Archives

Ten years ago, the Brabant Historisch Informatie Centrum and Regionaal Archief Tilburg started a chat service to help their online visitors. The archives have joined forces and now staff the chat service together. The service is very popular and has answered over 30,000 questions about the archival collections, searching for ancestors from … [Read more...]

Quick tip – Dutch DNA is often identified as something else

Many Dutch people taking a DNA test are surprised by the ethnicity predictions. Instead of Dutch, they're predicted to be French, German, English, or Scandinavian. When you think about the history of North-Western Europe, this is not surprising. The North Sea was the highway of the Middle Ages, with many people traveling for trade or pillage. … [Read more...]

Dutch Genealogy News for January 2020

Here is an overview of the new sources, projects, and news about archives that were announced last month. Online sources Almost 30,000 books were added to Delpher. The new addition includes children's books, school books, travel stories, books about female laborers, and a lot more. The majority of these books is in the public domain and can … [Read more...]

Quick tip – Patronymics are Often Misindexed

Before 1811, in some parts of the Netherlands, people went by patronymics only. These are names derived from the father's name, like Jansen = son of Jan and Pietersen = son of Pieter. Let's say we have a baptismal record mentioning a child named Dirk, son of Jan Pietersen. No last name or patronymic was indicated for Dirk. His father would be … [Read more...]