Quick tip – How to Find out Which Church Records Survive

Church records of baptisms, marriages, and burials are among the most popular genealogical sources to use. If you can't find a record, how do you know if the records don't exist anymore, or if you simply haven't found the person? In 1981, a book was published to help researchers, the Repertorium DTB. For each town, it lists the … [Read more...]

Dutch term – IJzen

IJzen means to break the ice. During wartime, the ice in the moats around fortified towns had to be broken up, to prevent hostile forces from walking over the moat to take the town. Sometimes, ijzen was the obligation of the citizens of the town, or of specific farmers in the area who rented the farm from the overlord. In other towns, the … [Read more...]

Source – Publication of the banns

In the Netherlands, you have to go in "ondertrouw" before you get married. This means that the banns are read, giving everyone in the community a chance to object to the marriage. In the period before the introduction of the civil registration, church records are the most important source of vital information. Many churches recorded the banns … [Read more...]

Quick tip – Amsterdam Scans now Free

The Amsterdam City Archives will no longer charge for their online scans. That means that you do not need pay-per-view credits anymore to consult the scans that are attached to their indexes or finding aids. Available indexes include: Church records of baptisms, marriages, and burials before 1811 Conveyance records of property … [Read more...]

Dutch term – Markt

A markt is a market. During the Middle Ages, the right to hold markets was a seignorial right, granted by the overlord. The right to have a market was often the first step to becoming a chartered town. Today, many towns have a weekly market on a fixed day of the week. Sometimes, a market has been held on that same day in that town for more than … [Read more...]

Dutch Records That Just Became Public

2017 has arrived, and that means that many records have become public. Many records are closed for 25, 50, 75, or 100 years. Records that can now be consulted include: Birth records of people born in 1916 (hi, grandma!) Marriage records of people married in 1941  Death records of people who died in 1966.  … [Read more...]

Quick tip – Finding the Current Name of an Old Place

When reading old records, you will often come across place names that cannot be found on a modern map. The spelling or the entire name may have changed. For example, the capital of Indonesia, Jakarta, was known as Batavia under Dutch rule. Former Amsterdam City Archivist Simon Hart researched the places of origin that were mentioned in the … [Read more...]

New Year’s Eve in 1880

New Year's Eve, 1880. My second great-grandfather Cornelis Flooren visited the house of his elderly parents. Some neighbors were there too. They were drinking away the old year and things started to get rowdy. One of the neighbors started calling girls names, and then insulted Cornelis' mother. Big mistake. Cornelis got angry. … [Read more...]

Looking back on 2016

Where has 2016 gone already?! My year was off to a great start in January, when I attended the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy and the Board meeting of the Association of Professional Genealogists. I met many amazing friends, some of whom I already knew online. They made me feel so welcome. While in Salt Lake City, I did some research at … [Read more...]

Quick tip – Did the family hop the border or vice versa?

The borders of the Netherlands have not always been what they are today. The borders were much different before 1839.  Several towns that are now in Germany once belonged to the Netherlands, and several Dutch towns were once part of the German states. Also, what used to be the southern part of the Netherlands is now Belgium and … [Read more...]